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Black Lives Matter activists spar on Twitter

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Two key and prominent leaders of the influential Black Lives Matter movement, DeRay Mckesson and Atlanta’s Shaun King, publicly sparred via Twitter Sunday night and shortly thereafter starting trending.

Here’s the entire exchange.

“I’ll keep this brief, but I’ll begin by saying that Shaun King blocked me when I asked questions re: planning/money re: JusticeTogether,” read one of Mckesson’s statements posted Sunday evening, referring to a now-shuttered charitable organization.

AJC file photo

AJC file photo

Y’all know, I’ve always been  Shaun King‘s biggest defender, ever since he wrote that article re: the distance between (Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson) and (Michael Brown)’s body. But, as a former board member of JusticeTogether, I didn’t know about the money or about the abrupt end. I had/have questions.”

Mckesson said he reached out to King via texts and calls but that his calls went to voicemail.

King responded with a nine-part tweet and then a lengthy statement.

“I’m terrible with people,” one of his posts read. “Good on the mic. Good with words. Good w/ my family. Otherwise, I’m a reclusive, anti-social, awkward guy.”

His final post, the statement, ended with an apology to Mckesson but said “we aren’t really partners on this path.”

“I apologize for adding to the drama,” one of his posts said.

Black Lives Matter activists have kept a national focus on issues including police brutality and racial inequality. In October, activists in Atlanta disrupted presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton’s speech at Clark Atlanta University.

King became a trending topic over the summer, after  Breitbart columnist Milo Yiannopoulos posted an article titled “Yes, Shaun King is white, confirm family members.

King responded with a series of tweets and denied ever misleading anyone about his racial background.

“The key facts about my biological relatives are all wrong,” posted King, a Morehouse graduate. “They tried, but my family, like many of yours, is one big mess. If you have known me from when I was in elementary school at Huntertown Elementary until now, you’ve known me as black or bi-racial.”

King followed up with a Daily Kos column saying in part, “I have been told for most of my life that the white man on my birth certificate is not my biological father and that my actual biological father is a light-skinned black man.”

Following the recent publicly aired disagreement between King and Mckesson, Yiannopoulos posted this lengthy update recently

Here’s a look at some of the on-line commentary:

https://twitter.com/CJonC16/status/676239473085026304